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Tag Archives: Max Johns

All’s Well That Ends Well – Exeter Northcott

Writer: William Shakespeare Adaptor: Dominic Power Director: Andrew Hilton Reviewer: Lucy Corley All’s Well That Ends Well is the second half of a double-bill at Exeter Northcott by Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory, following a production of Hamlet that was fairly well-received, if a little predictable for this reviewer. Back for a second round, we find the same concrete-esque grey ...

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Hamlet – Exeter Northcott

Writer: William Shakespeare Director: Andrew Hilton Reviewer: Lucy Corley The poster for Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory’s Hamlet – a skull wearing a red nose and grinning – promises a quirky, unique reading of the play that the company, unfortunately, does not deliver. This isn’t to say that the show is unsuccessful: it may not have been the production its ...

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All’s Well That Ends Well – Tobacco Factory Theatres, Bristol

Writer: William Shakespeare Director: Andrew Hilton Reviewer: Claire Hayes   All’s Well That Ends Well is the second play in Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory’s season commemorating the 400th anniversary of the Bard’s death. Following on from Hamlet, and again co-produced with Tobacco Factory Theatres, this difficult, lesser-performed comedy has been rewritten in parts by Dominic Power, moving its action ...

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Hamlet – Tobacco Factory Theatres, Bristol

Alan Mahon as Hamlet at Tobacco Factory, Bristol

Writer: William Shakespeare Director: Andrew Hilton Reviewer: Claire Hayes Approaching the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, it seems that one of his most famous tragedies is being staged now more than ever. Benedict Cumberbatch’s high profile Hamlet attracted a legion of his fans to the Barbican last year, while Paapa Essiedu - who previously played Romeo at the Tobacco Factory ...

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Life Raft – Bristol Old Vic

Original writer: Georg Kaiser Adaptor: Fin Kennedy Director: Melly Still Reviewer: Kris Hallett 13 children adrift on a life raft with little rations and only a distant hope of rescue to sustain them. For Georg Kaiser, writing in 1945, the idea of these children being stranded at sea in a war-torn world would have seemed brutally prescient. In a week ...

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