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WireDo – The Lowry, Salford

Writers: Hanna Moisala and Maisy Taylor.

Director: Adrian Berry.

Reviewer: Sam Lowe.

WireDo is an entrancing celebration of the circus art form and what the human body can achieve. The show is split up into two acts. First, Maisy Taylor performs an aerial routine using a corde lisse and a book, which is about being alone and exploring the beauty in solitude. This is followed with an act by Hanna Moisala, where using her body, a tightwire, and a physical composition inspired from the Japanese rope art of Shibari, she questions what happens to the body when it surrenders to manipulation. They both command the stage with confidence, precision, and elegance.

In the first act, the manipulation of the corde lisse to make it appear like Taylor is sitting on a swing as she is reading a book, is a beautifully simple concept that captures the comfort in privacy. Taylor’s aerial routine develops the notion of beauty in solitude in how she appears to lie down and float in mid-air. It is simply magic. The blue lighting and solo piano music intertwines to elicit a calming and soothing effect, making the show relaxing and hypnotic to watch. At the end of the act, there is a change over in set from one performer to the next, the lights come up in the auditorium, and the audience have to wait. This is not necessary because theatrically, Moisala could begin her routine as Taylor finishes hers, making this a fluid transition rather than stopping and starting.

The latter half of the show is captivating in exploring how the body reacts to the extreme opposites of restriction and release. Moisala’s routine is well practiced and her body goes through an impressive and physically-demanding routine, from the refined shaping of her body during the movement sections to jumping on the tight rope. One stand-out trick is demonstrating the splits on the tight rope, the physical control is amazing. The Japanese rope art adds an intriguing layer to the piece, emphasising the notion of restriction of the body. The preparation and build-up to her walking the tightwire does feel slow at times. The ending of the show involves Moisala spinning gracefully in mid-air, as her body is connected to the tightwire above. Moisala looks to be swimming as the spot-light fades to a blackout, this is as mesmerising as the music that synchronises seamlessly with the routine. There are effective moments during the performance where there is just silence except for the breathing of the performer which highlights the pushing of the body to extremes and reinforces the sense of liveness.

The ending of the show involves Moisala spinning gracefully in mid-air, as her body is connected to the tightwire above. Moisala looks to be swimming as the spotlight fades to a blackout, this is as mesmerising as the music that synchronises seamlessly with the routine. There are effective moments during the performance where there is just silence except for the breathing of the performer which highlights the pushing of the body to extremes and reinforces the sense of liveness.

While the performers execute impressive demonstrations of what the body can do, it would be interesting to see more explored theatrically, in terms of storytelling and meanings, allowing for more physically creative options and production possibilities.

Reviewed on 4 February 2017 | Image: Contributed

 

Writers: Hanna Moisala and Maisy Taylor. Director: Adrian Berry. Reviewer: Sam Lowe. WireDo is an entrancing celebration of the circus art form and what the human body can achieve. The show is split up into two acts. First, Maisy Taylor performs an aerial routine using a corde lisse and a book, which is about being alone and exploring the beauty in solitude. This is followed with an act by Hanna Moisala, where using her body, a tightwire, and a physical composition inspired from the Japanese rope art of Shibari, she questions what happens to the body when it surrenders to…

Review Overview

The Reviews Hub Score

Elegant and impressive.

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