Home / Edinburgh Festival Fringe / The Fetch Wilson – Pleasance Courtyard, Edinburgh

The Fetch Wilson – Pleasance Courtyard, Edinburgh

Writer: Stewart Roche

Director: Jed Murray

Reviewer: Tom Ralphs

This is a tale of two Liam Wilson’s, both from Dublin. There is one bad one and one neither good nor bad, just okay, which, as he says, is all most people are, if they’re honest. The two start at the same boarding school on the same day and their paths continue to cross over the years.

The Liam Wilson who tells the story is the insignificant one, but he tells an engaging story as he enters the stage wearing a child’s lifebelt, musing on life and the nature of good and evil. The reason why he’s doing this isn’t clear for a long time as he mixes stories of his childhood with anecdotes about pubs with bad toilets and you wonder where it is all heading, if it’s heading anywhere.

Midway through, however, the story moves from Ireland to Budapest as Wilson travels to meet his father and is introduced to a woman who is an expert at card games. This is when the key part of the story emerges and the play moves from being seemingly little more than random musings on a theme, and into something more cohesive.

As the various strands of the story are drawn together, the two Liam’s are in each other’s company more often and their stories become increasingly intertwined. The conclusion is not entirely unexpected, but that isn’t too much of a problem as it’s the way the piece is delivered, with Edwin Mullane as Liam gradually drawing the audience into his world, that makes this both cosy and unsettling.

The lunchtime slot the show has at the Attic is perfectly suited to it and it’s a good way to ease yourself into the rest of the day.

Reviewed on 2 August, running from 1 to 27 August 2018 | Image: Contributed

Writer: Stewart Roche Director: Jed Murray Reviewer: Tom Ralphs This is a tale of two Liam Wilson’s, both from Dublin. There is one bad one and one neither good nor bad, just okay, which, as he says, is all most people are, if they’re honest. The two start at the same boarding school on the same day and their paths continue to cross over the years. The Liam Wilson who tells the story is the insignificant one, but he tells an engaging story as he enters the stage wearing a child’s lifebelt, musing on life and the nature of good…

Review Overview

The Reviews Hub Score

An engaging story of good and evil

About The Reviews Hub - Scotland

The Reviews Hub - Scotland
The Scotland team is under the editorship of Lauren Humphreys. The Reviews Hub was set up in 2007. We aim to review all professional types of theatre, whether that be Commercial, Repertory or Fringe as well as Comedy, Music, Gigs etc.

One comment

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    “Fetch Wilson” is a gripping and darkly comic monologue with more twists than a turkey twizzler. Fine writing and a terrific performance make this a 4 star way to ease into lunch. Highly recommended