Home / Tag Archives: Tristan Bates Theatre (page 5)

Tag Archives: Tristan Bates Theatre

Call Mr Robeson – Tristan Bates Theatre, London

Writer: Tayo Aluko Director: Olusola Oyeleye Reviewer: Michael Gray [rating:3] Paul Robeson loved London. He first played Othello at the Savoy in 1930 [then something of a novelty – 35 years later Olivier was still blacking up for the Moor].Now, fresh from the Labour Party Conference fringe in Brighton, he's back in the heart of Theatreland, in a compelling monodrama ...

Read More »

The Tell 8 – Tristan Bates Theatre, London

Writer: Lee Broderick, Denise O’Brien, Donna Palmer, Alla Taha Director: Penny Cliff Reviewer: Christopher Hong [rating:1] Two groups of four plays over two sessionsshowcase new writing from recent graduates of The Tell Theatre Company’s playwriting course. It is a fantastic opportunity for the new writers to have their work performed in a professional production. The question is whether the production ...

Read More »

Warde Street – Tristan Bates Theatre, London

Writer: Damien Tracey Director: Jason B Moore Reviewer: Stephen Bates [rating:2] On 7 July 2005, the day after London’s triumph in being chosen to host the 2012 Summer Olympic Games, the City was rocked by a devastating terrorist attack instigated by Islamic extremists. This one act play sets out to show how the aftermath of that attack continues to haunt ...

Read More »

Rewritten – Tristan Bates Theatre, London

Writers: Jo Pockett, Caro Dixey, Serena Haywood, Sarah Pitard Director: Cat Robey Reviewer: Christopher Hong [rating:2.5] The premise of this collection of four plays is they allstem from a starting three pages of dialog between two people with a piece of paper and a lunchbox as props. Part of the Camden Fringe, the dialog is left deliberately vague and can ...

Read More »

Love vs Hate – Tristan Bates Theatre, London

Writers: Edwin Preece and Chantelle Dusette Directors: Sean Turner and Zoe Ford Reviewer: Stephen Bates [rating:4] The title implies a battle between contrasting emotions and the structure of he evening implies a battle of the sexes. In fact, what we see is two one-act plays, both under one hour; the first about hate is written, directed and performed entirely by ...

Read More »

My Favourite Madman – Tristan Bates Theatre, London

Writer: Elchin Afandiyev Director: Matthew Gould Reviewer: Karl O'Doherty [rating:3.5] At some point, about a third of the way through My Favourite Madman, it's best to just forget about trying to gain cerebral enjoyment from this play and instead relax into the nonsensical characters and great performances on stage. Afterwards though, there will be plenty to reflect on if you ...

Read More »

Making Dickie Happy – Tristan Bates Theatre, London

Writer: Jeremy Kingston Director: Robert Gillespie Reviewer: Gerorgina Newman [rating:3] Jeremy Kingston's witty and enjoyable play is notable for its sharp, incisive, Cowardesque turn of phrase. Neatly directed by Robert Gillespie, the main appeal of this production is the cleverly-written playscript with its memorable one-liners and poignant gags. Kingston offers up some colourfully amusing comments about love, life, sex, relationships, ...

Read More »

Listening – Tristan Bates Theatre, London

Writer: Nellie McQuinn Director: Veronica Quilligan Reviewer: Steve Barfield [rating:4.5] Superbly and bravely acted by Nellie McQuinn, this one woman show makes for a very harrowing, powerful and emotionally moving hour in the theatre. To say it is enjoyable or even cathartic would be mistaken, as this is a bearing witness to the terrifying horror and loss of the 7/7 ...

Read More »