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Tag Archives: Paul Barritt

The Animals and Children Took To The Streets – HOME, Manchester

Music: Lillian Henley Writer/Director: Suzanne Andrade Reviewer: Sam Lowe “Granny’s Gum Drop?” a mysterious woman asks walking around the auditorium handing out sweets to the audience. People are compelled to take them, even if they don’t end up eating them. This is no innocent gesture in kind as the sweets are for a political purpose. The performers tonight are: Felicity ...

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Golem – Liverpool Playhouse

Writer and Director: Suzanne Andrade Film, Animation and Design: Paul Barritt Music: Lillian Henley Reviewer: Daryl Holden The world that 1927’s Golem portrays is one of social decline. A world where individualism leads down the path to nonexistence and consumerism inevitably ends up at the top of the food chain. By all means, it’s a story that the theatre seems ...

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Golem by 1927 – Harrogate Theatre

Writer/Director: Suzanne Andrade Music: Lillian Henley Designer: Esme Appleton Animator: Paul Barritt Reviewer: Ron Simpson Golem is one of those shows where it’s difficult to visualise what you’re about to see from the advance publicity. In this case, however, it’s almost as difficult afterwards to describe what you’ve seen. To start with the obvious, Golem is a brilliant piece of ...

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Golem – Trafalgar Studios 1, London

Writer &Director: Suzanne Andrade Reviewer: Scott Stait   The chances are, you have an online social media presence. More likely than not, that’s how you stumbled into this purple corner of the internet. Did you arrive here through choice, or because somebody else suggested you should? Golem, loosely based on Gustav Meyrink’sDer Golem taps into the current anxieties of the ...

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The Animals and the Children Took to the Streets – Theatre Royal, Plymouth

Director and Writer: Suzanne Andrade Film, Animation and Design: Paul Barritt Music: Lillian Henley Reviewer: Marina Spark [rating: 3] The Animals and the Children Took to the Streets engages the audience from the moment they enter the theatre, as three large screens display a flickering 1950’s B-Movie city scape that instantly catches the eye. However, 1927 do not stop there, ...

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