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Blush – Underbelly Cowgate, Edinburgh

Writer: Charlotte Josephine

Director: Ed Stamollouian

Reviewer: David Doyle

Charlotte Josephines Blush doesnt pull any punches. Its fast-paced, razor-sharp, and proves to be a vital examination of revenge porn. Weaving together the stories of five people affected by revenge porn, the two-hander, starring Daniel Foxsmith and Josephine herself, takes on a subject that makes for at times uncomfortable but always compelling viewing.

In the hands of director Ed Stamollouian, the piece has a frantic energy that makes for gripping viewing. With only a simple set, Stamollouian focuses on the text and Foxsmith and Josephine manage to craft exemplary performances. From the first moments both Foxsmith and Josephine dominate the space, pulling the audience into the murky world of the revenge porn. The piece itself is innovatively staged and boasts some exceptionally conceived and executed lighting design.

The subject matter of the piece is challenging but the exploration of it never feels overly polemical. At times certain strands of the performance feel more polished than others, in particular, the female characters feel as though their stories are more developed. However, throughout the stories explored feel grittily real. Blush doesnt offer too many answers instead it poses a series of important questions that are crucial in todays society.

The piece is among some of the best new writing that youll see at the Fringe this year. Punchy and powerful, it never fails to land its mark, and with tight direction, and two wonderful performances, Blush really is must-watch theatre this Edinburgh Fringe.

Runs until 28 August 2016 (not 16)

Writer: Charlotte Josephine Director: Ed Stamollouian Reviewer: David Doyle Charlotte Josephine’s Blush doesn’t pull any punches. It’s fast-paced, razor-sharp, and proves to be a vital examination of revenge porn. Weaving together the stories of five people affected by revenge porn, the two-hander, starring Daniel Foxsmith and Josephine herself, takes on a subject that makes for at times uncomfortable but always compelling viewing. In the hands of director Ed Stamollouian, the piece has a frantic energy that makes for gripping viewing. With only a simple set, Stamollouian focuses on the text and Foxsmith and Josephine manage to craft exemplary performances. From…

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The Reviews Hub - Scotland
The Scotland team is under the editorship of Lauren Humphreys. The Reviews Hub was set up in 2007. We aim to review all professional types of theatre, whether that be Commercial, Repertory or Fringe as well as Comedy, Music, Gigs etc.