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Antigone – Northern Stage, Newcastle

Writer: Roy Williams

Music: Sandy Nuttgens

Director: Marcus Romer

Reviewer: Gemma Hirst

In the 21st century, society exists where technology and young people are forever developing and are beginning to take over the universe. Antigone shows what a headstrong woman can do when she puts her mind to it, as Pilot Theatre’s Marcus Romer brings the classic tale originally written by Sophocles up-to-date.

Antigonetells the story about one young lady named Anitgone (Savannah Gordon- Liburd) who wishes to put her dead brother to rest, but Creo (Mark Monero) refuses to do so, as he classed the brother as being unruly. Anitgone defies all that is seen to be right in the world and unleashes hell in Thebes.

The play is like Shakespeares’ Romeo &Juliet meets Eastenders meets Big Brother, attempting to fuse an old tale into the modern world in order to make it relatable to the modern day audience.

Set in what we are told is Thebes (Greece); it looks rather like an underground setting to a club, with dirty cages, pipes and bins it looks like the dark corners of London’s West End. Thus all the characters speak with a London twang such as “we is fam” and “nuttin, man” It gives the piece an edge, yet loosing the meaning behind the words. With the hyped up set and complete modernizing of the text, the story gets somewhat lost and it is difficult to ascertain what the piece is trying to covey.

The music used intensifies the performance; sounds you hear if you have tinnitus – the high pitched humming sounds increase the tense events which are created in the story. Particularly in the scenes lead by Monero, who not only commands the characters around him but engages with audience and commands our presences also. Doing justice to his characters as King of Thebes.

The use of the hidden cameras built into the set is well appreciated; it gives a sense of danger and puts the audience on edge. With the feeling of being watched, it is intended to be as if the Greek mythological gods above are watching over us. Rather a clever idea, however it lacks in quality as there are moments where the audience are supposed see the scenes being projected by the camera and yet that is not clear. The projector work is used throughout Antigone but the techniques are weak and appear to be pointless as it does not add any dynamic to the narrative.

Antigonehad a clear message of youth and independence and is reminiscent of a soap projected onto a stage.

Runs until: 11th October 2014
Photo Credit: Robert Day

Writer: Roy Williams Music: Sandy Nuttgens Director: Marcus Romer Reviewer: Gemma Hirst In the 21st century, society exists where technology and young people are forever developing and are beginning to take over the universe. Antigone shows what a headstrong woman can do when she puts her mind to it, as Pilot Theatre’s Marcus Romer brings the classic tale originally written by Sophocles up-to-date. Antigonetells the story about one young lady named Anitgone (Savannah Gordon- Liburd) who wishes to put her dead brother to rest, but Creo (Mark Monero) refuses to do so, as he classed the brother as being unruly.…

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