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Tag Archives: Suba Das

Wipers – Curve, Leicester

Simon Rivers as Sadiq in Wipers

Writer: Ishy Din Director: Suba Das Reviewer: James Garrington   Among the wealth of material written about the First World War, there is actually very little drama based on the contribution of South Asian soldiers, even though by the end of the war over one-and-a-half million of them had crossed the ocean to fight with the Allied armies. Wipers is ...

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Shiv – Curve, Leicester

Writer: Aditi Brennan Kapil Director: Suba Das Reviewer: Phil Lowe The New York Times has described the work of American playwright Aditi Brennan Kapil as ‘Rich in feeling, wide in scope and teeming with poetry’ so it is with great consideration that associate director Suba Das and Curve Leicester have chosen this newly penned one act play Shiv to launch ...

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Abigail’s Party – Curve Leicester

Writer: Mike Leigh Director: Suba Das Reviewer: Phil Lowe “I told you nobody'd like olives Laurence.” says the lead character Beverly to her put down husband. He retorts, “Not nobody Beverly: I like olives. And that's twenty-five per cent of the assembled company” In such cleverly written lines throughout Leigh's comically tragic masterpiece, Abigail's Party, we recognise 1970s affluent pretension ...

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Mother Clap’s Molly House – Curve, Leicester

Writer: Mark Ravenhill Director: Suba Das Reviewed by Karen McCandless If Curve and De Montfort University (DMU) were looking for a controversial play to perform then Mother Clap’s Molly House was a great choice. But being controversial doesn’t always pay off. First performed in September 2001 at the National Theatre's Lyttelton Theatre, Mark Ravenhill’s play explores the theme of sexuality. ...

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The Revenger’s Tragedy – Hoxton Hall, London

Writer: Thomas Middleton Director: Suba Das Reviewer: Ian Foster [rating:1] Technical difficulties around health and safety meant that Suba Das’ production of The Revenger’s Tragedy had to be rapidly reconceived from its intended promenade aspect but little can excuse shining a bright light into the eyes of part of the audience for 15 minutes. Thomas Middleton’s Jacobean blood-fest now sits ...

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