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Tag Archives: Martin Foreman

Desire And Pursuit – Etcetera Theatre, London

Writer and Director: Martin Foreman Reviewer: Nichola Daunton Martin Foreman’s Desire and Pursuit, a series of three monologues,explores faith, repressed sexuality and moral conflict within the Catholic Church and Thomas Mann’s Venice. The first monologue is Angel, the story of a Catholic priest who is torn between his love of God and his love of men. Performed by Christopher Peacock, ...

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Angel and Now We Are Pope – The London Theatre, New Cross

Writer: Martin Foreman Director: Martin Foreman Reviewer: Jon Wainwright Martin Foreman has written and directed two short one-man plays (combined they come in at under two hours with an interval), each of which stands alone as a distinct and intriguing story, and both of which share some weighty themes. Since the characters themselves are deeply religious men, their preoccupations — ...

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Tadzio Speaks – Etcetera Theatre, London

Writer and Director: Martin Foreman Reviewer: Stephen Bates [rating:3] Thomas Mann’s 1912 novella Death in Venice is perhaps best known because of Luchino Visconti’s 1971 film adaptation, which is regarded by many as a masterpiece of European cinema. It also inspired a Benjamin Britten opera, first performed in 1973. The story was set at Venice Lido where an ageing writer ...

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Californian Lives – OSO Arts Centre, London

Writer: Martin Foreman Director: Emma King-Farlow Reviewer: Fran Beaton [rating:2.5] It is a theatrical challenge knowing how to begin a monologue. How do both the writer and the actor manage to engage an audience with nothing to go on? This is a task faced by Martin Foreman in his Californian Lives. The three act play consists of three monologues, each ...

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Californian Lives – King’s Head Theatre, London

Writer: Martin Foreman Director: Emma King-Farlow Reviewer: Stephen Bates [rating:3.5] With the audience seated around the performance area, this is a collection of monologues which effectively become intimate one-way conversations. Three experienced and accomplished actors play very different unnamed characters linked only by the fact they they are residents of California. Firstly Los Feliz, which opens with the character, a ...

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