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Second Copy: 2045 – Summerhall, Edinburgh

Reviewer: David Doyle

Set in 2045, at the end of a period of conflict, Second Copy: 2045 is a look at art in the wake of conflict and the death of artists. Given the current world climate, it is a premise that has real potential but unfortunately none of that is realised in this disappointing production.

Much of the piece is framed as a documentary on the history of Moroccan art but its look at contemporary art practice is often far too pretentious to be enlightening or engaging. Fraught with an academic anxiety to explain, the piece leaves no room for the audience to think. Instead, it burdens them with overworked explanations of what is happening on stage. This in itself could be the launch pad for an insightful look at academia and the arts but this is not something that the show seeks to explore.

A large part of the shows failing is down to its lack of heart. Framed as an exploration of a cultures art after those artists have died in conflict gives plenty of scope for an emotional impact but the clinical nature of the piece means that is entirely absent. The combination of this with the arduous explanation of art means that the piece is alienating to its audience and fails to hold their attention even for its forty-five minute running time.

A piece with potential to be interesting that squanders that potential is often more frustrating than one which lacked potential. In this instance, there is a pressing issue at stake and one that has real merit in exploring but Second Copy: 2045 doesnt even manage to scratch the surface of that potential.

Runs until 27 August 2017 | Image: Contributed

Reviewer: David Doyle Set in 2045, at the end of a period of conflict, Second Copy: 2045 is a look at art in the wake of conflict and the death of artists. Given the current world climate, it is a premise that has real potential but unfortunately none of that is realised in this disappointing production. Much of the piece is framed as a documentary on the history of Moroccan art but its look at contemporary art practice is often far too pretentious to be enlightening or engaging. Fraught with an academic anxiety to explain, the piece leaves no room…

Review Overview

The Reviews Hub Score

Disappointing

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The Scotland team is under the editorship of Lauren Humphreys. The Reviews Hub was set up in 2007. We aim to review all professional types of theatre, whether that be Commercial, Repertory or Fringe as well as Comedy, Music, Gigs etc.

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