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London Reviews

Man to Man – Wilton’s Music Hall, London

Writer: Manfred Karge Translation: Alexandra Wood Directors: Bruce Guthrie and Scott Graham Reviewer: Scott Matthewman Manfred Karge’s one-act, one-woman play depicts the tale of a woman in working class 1930s Germany who, after the death of her husband from cancer, assumes his identity in order to retain the income from his job. Initially thought of as an urban legend, the ...

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Boudica  – Globe Theatre, London

Writer: Tristan Bernays Director: Eleanor Rhode Reviewer: Richard Maguire "We will win back this land" chant Boudica and her allies as they prepare to march on London, razing Camulodunum (Colchester) to the ground on the way, and it’s hard not to get swept away in this heady patriotism currently being played out at The Globe. What little we know of ...

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The Blinding Light – Jermyn St Theatre, London

Writer: Howard Brenton Director: Tom Littler Reviewer: Karl O'Doherty “The kidneys were revolutionary.” Playwright Howard Benton has managed the neat trick of turning out some of the most preposterous, indulgent dialogue imaginable for his lead character, and making it seem not only perfectly acceptable but a key element of what makes this a beautiful piece of theatre. Tackling the Swedish ...

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The March on Russia – Orange Tree Theatre, London

Writer: David Storey Director: Alice Hamilton Reviewer: Richard Maguire Until this year, theatre reviewers had to exercise caution when it came to writing about David Storey plays. Reliable rumour has it that back in 1976 Storey slapped The Guardian’s Michael Billington around the head after he had written a particularly sniffy review of Storey’s new play. In fact, there’s very ...

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The Knowledge – Charing Cross Theatre, London

Writer: Jack Rosenthal (Adapted by Simon Block) Director: Maureen Lipman Reviewer: Maryam Philpott The black cab is an iconic London landmark every bit as recognisable as Buckingham Palace or St Paul’s Cathedral, and its drivers carry a hard-earned encyclopaedic understanding of the city’s 15,000 central streets as well as the various suburbs. The long process of obtaining ‘The Knowledge’ was ...

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Doubt: A Parable – Southwark Playhouse, London

Writer: John Patrick Shanley Director: Chè Walker Reviewer: Richard Maguire It’s a brave move for the Southwark Playhouse to present Doubt, when the play, written in 2005, is best remembered for the film version, which came out in 2008 trailing Oscar nominations in its wake. Meryl Streep and Philip Seymour Hoffman so embodied the roles of Sister Aloysius and Father ...

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5 Soldiers: The Body is the Frontline  – Yeomanry House, Bloomsbury

Choreographer and Director: Rosie Kay Reviewer: Richard Maguire Philosopher Michel Foucault suggested that the body of the modern soldier is ‘manipulated, shaped, trained’ so that it ‘obeys, responds, and becomes skilful’.  The body of the dancer is under the same pressure, and 5 Soldiers, in association with Sadler’s Wells, and the British Army, cleverly explores the similarities between these two bodies. The ...

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Waiting For Godot – Arts Theatre, London

Writer: Samuel Beckett Director: Peter Reid Reviewer: Maryam Philpott Hmmm… lalalalala…. [drums fingers] … you’re probably waiting for the review to start. British people spend an awfully long time waiting for things; we queue patiently in the Post Office or at the bus stop, endure months till the next holiday or wait quietly for late friends. So, Samuel Beckett’s best-known ...

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