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I Wish I Was Lonely – Battersea Arts Centre, London

Writers &Directors: Hannah Jane Walker and Chris Thorpe

Reviewer: Joanna Trainor

“If I can’t miss you, I can’t love you.” Examining the technological culture of the modern world has never been quite so poignant, thought-provoking and hilarious all in a 70 minute slot. From horse haikus, to Alexander Fleming, to life-changing lines, rarely has an audience had to think so carefully about the power, control and effect of the mobile phone.

Having to leave your phone on during a show feels rather naughty, but being called by performer Chris Thorpe in an otherwise silent room isn’t actually that embarrassing for long. The relationship he and Hannah Jane Walker develop with the crowd puts everyone at ease, and means their poems and monologues don’t feel preachy and judgemental, just observations that you probably hadn’t considered before.

A conversation about love, sex and relationships has never been so cold and heartless, as when Walker and Thorpe speak at each other in monotone, as though sending texts. However another more darker call to someone else feels intensely personal, and the importance of ones voice is something you’ll carry with you after leaving the Battersea Arts Centre.

It is important not to give away too much of the action of the show, because the gift of the piece lies in going with the flow. Each performance is also tailored to the interactivity of the audience’s phones on any given night.

It may seem like an obvious idea, but it simply isn’t. Eye-opening, playful, distressing, isolating, uniting; to learn so much and go through so many emotions in such a short space of time means that this is something that really needs to be seen. Our phones may mean that we are never alone, but “alone is different to lonely”.

Runs until 15th March 2014

Writers &Directors: Hannah Jane Walker and Chris Thorpe Reviewer: Joanna Trainor “If I can’t miss you, I can’t love you.” Examining the technological culture of the modern world has never been quite so poignant, thought-provoking and hilarious all in a 70 minute slot. From horse haikus, to Alexander Fleming, to life-changing lines, rarely has an audience had to think so carefully about the power, control and effect of the mobile phone. Having to leave your phone on during a show feels rather naughty, but being called by performer Chris Thorpe in an otherwise silent room isn’t actually that embarrassing for…

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The Public Reviews Score

Has to be seen!

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The Reviews Hub - London
The Reviews Hub London is under the editorship of John Roberts.The Reviews Hub was set up in 2007. Our mission is to provide the most in-depth, nationwide arts coverage online.

One comment

  1. Matthew Linley

    Here’s my apology to Callum…after seeing ‘I wish I was lonely’ http://matthewlinley.wordpress.com/2013/08/22/a-letter-to-calum/